The Fellowship Blogs

The Fellowship of United Methodists in Music and Worship Arts

Disappointment

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Tenth Sunday after Pentecost

Week of: August 18, 2019
Scripture: Isaiah 5:1-7

Let me sing for my beloved my love-song concerning his vineyard ...
(Isaiah 5:1, NRSV)

Devotion

The opening of this pericope in the 5th chapter of Isaiah presents itself as a love song. The writer begins by speaking of the many things his beloved did to care for his vineyard to promote growth and a fruitful harvest, but was met with disappointment. Not only were his expectations unfulfilled, but he also faced judgment for this perceived failure.

This text reminds us that things will not always work as we plan. There will be times when we are faced with disappointment. There will be times when we labor, expecting the results to be a fruitful harvest, but end up with an unproductive yield. While this does not seem fair, we continue to labor, knowing that we do not labor in vain.

Thus, we continue to preach, to pray, to sing, and to worship knowing that in due season, our vineyard will flourish.

Prayer

Lord, in the midst of disappointments, let us remember that we do not labor in vain. We know you see our good works. Let that knowledge propel us to continue in our calling, especially when others want to judge us as failures. Amen.

Sherri Wood-PoweThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Pastor, Oak Chapel UMC
Chair, Baltimore-Washington Conference Worship Team
Silver Spring, MD

Photo: A dramatic portrayal of scripture as seen during worship at Music & Worship Arts Week 2019. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Faith Exemplified

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Ninth Sunday after Pentecost

Week of: August 11, 2019
Scripture: Hebrews 11:1-3, 8-16

Now faith is the assurance of things hoped for, the conviction of things not seen.
(Hebrews 11:1, NRSV)

Devotion

Blind faith seems like an oxymoron. Faith in and of itself is blind, so we don’t need to say “blind faith.” Faith requires us to believe in that which we cannot see. In faith, we have full assurance that all we hope for will come to pass, if we are in the will of God.

As worship artists, we strive to create worship, believing that the Spirit of the Lord will reign in the service. We expect that persons who attend worship and are fully engaged will encounter God in a transformative way.

Each week, we want to offer hope through worship. Our worship celebrates a God of hope who transcends despair, who gives light in darkness, peace in chaos, and love instead of hate. We must give persons attending worship something in which to look forward, to believe. If our hope is merely put in that which we can see, we become disenchanted and depressed. Instead, we live in hope, believing the promises of God.

Prayer

God, help us not only to live in faith, but also to be examples of faith in all we say and do. Our hope is fixed in our ability to believe that which we cannot see. Let us see with eyes of faith. Amen.

Sherri Wood-PoweThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Pastor, Oak Chapel UMC
Chair, Baltimore-Washington Conference Worship Team
Silver Spring, MD

Photo: Members of the dance ensemble perform at Music & Worship Arts Week 2019. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Give Thanks to the Lord

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Eighth Sunday after Pentecost

Week of: August 4, 2019
Scripture: Psalm 107:1-9, 43

Let those who are wise give heed to these things and consider the steadfast love of the Lord.
(Psalm 107:43, NRSV)

Devotion

The psalm for this week is a psalm of thanksgiving. It is believed to be composed for use in special thanksgiving rituals. These rituals gave an opportunity for the redeemed of the Lord to celebrate their redemption by offering thanks to God and sharing their testimony with others.

Psalm 107 provides several instances in which the people have been redeemed, but our pericope only covers persons who have been rescued from wandering in the desert, hungry and thirsty. The Lord redeemed them and now it is time for them to offer thanksgiving.

In our worship services, people come in need of redemption and seek to give thanks for having received it. Everyone shows up at a different place with a different situation. As worship planners, we must make space for everyone. Sometimes, it is as simple as providing a time to share joys and concerns; other times, our rituals need to be more involved.

It is important that we come together as a community or congregation to share God’s movement in our lives, reminding others that God’s redemption is for all. Just as God brought one person out of the desert, God will also bring out others.

Prayer

Almighty God, we give thanks for your steadfast love and for redeeming us. Help us to facilitate worship encounters with opportunities to share testimony of your goodness and redemption. Amen.

Sherri Wood-PoweThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Pastor, Oak Chapel UMC
Chair, Baltimore-Washington Conference Worship Team
Silver Spring, MD

Photo: Congregants hold hands prior to receiving Communion during Friday worship at Music & Worship Arts Week 2019. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Remember, Reconnect, Revitalize

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Seventh Sunday after Pentecost

Week of: July 28, 2019
Scripture: Colossians 2:6-15, (16-19)

You received Christ Jesus, the Master; now live him. You’re deeply rooted in him. You’re well-constructed upon him. You know your way around the faith. Now do what you’ve been taught. School’s out. Quit studying the subject and start living it! And let your living spill over into thanksgiving.
(Colossians 2:6-7, The Message)

Devotion

One of the beautiful sources of revitalization in our practice of discipleship is remembering and reconnecting with the beginning of our lives as Christ-followers.

When and how did you first encounter the Living Christ? Where were you? What did you see, hear, smell, taste, touch? How did you feel? What did you think? What did you do?

Did you receive this encounter as a gift? How did you respond? Did you experience it more in your mind, your heart, your physical being, or your innermost soul?

Since then, how have you deeply rooted yourself in Christ Jesus? What daily, weekly, seasonal practices have helped you sink your roots deeply into the ground of your being?

How have you constructed your life upon Christ? Have you made decisions for the way you spend your time, money, energy, even your vocation, based on your encounter with the Living Christ?

Are there ways in which your everyday "yes" to the tasks related to your life as a worship arts leader embody "living it"?

Prayer

Living Christ, let my living spill over into thanksgiving to you. Amen.  

Leigh Anne TaylorThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
President, The Fellowship
Deacon, The United Methodist Church
Lynchburg District Revitalization Coordinator
Lynchburg, VA

Photo: The labyrinth next to Memorial Chapel at Lake Junaluska is seen during Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Only One Thing

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Sixth Sunday after Pentecost

Week of: July 21, 2019
Scripture: Luke 10:38-42

Martha, Martha, you are worried and distracted by many things; there is need of only one thing.
(Luke 10:41-42, NRSV)

Devotion

When we can stay connected to God/Love in all our tasks as worship arts leaders, whether it's mental, emotional or physical work, we more fully inhabit God/Love in our soul. Staying connected to love is liberating, healing and holy work … and over time, it transforms us into Christian disciples and changes our leadership.

Choosing to connect with God/Love in our daily tasks as worship arts leaders reflects the choice of sister Mary.

Neglecting to connect reflects the choice of sister Martha, who was too worried and distracted by her to-do list to make that connection, even when the Lord of Love was, quite literally, staring her in the face.

I don’t think Jesus means to shame us if we resemble Martha or honor us if we resemble Mary. I think we're meant to see ourselves reflected in the choices and activity of both of these dear friends of Jesus.

What's one thing you can do (or stop doing) throughout the day to refresh your focus on Jesus, to connect with God/Love as you go about the daily tasks of your work as a worship artist? What's one thing you can do (or stop doing) to let go of worry and distraction?

Can you hear Jesus speak your name gently, lovingly, helping you focus?

Prayer

Being with you, Loving Jesus, is the one thing that is necessary. Help me to let go of the rest. Amen.  

Leigh Anne TaylorThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
President-Elect, The Fellowship
Deacon, The United Methodist Church
Lynchburg District Revitalization Coordinator
Lynchburg, VA

Photo: The Lake Junaluska Cross is seen after an afternoon rain at Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Transformed People

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Fifth Sunday after Pentecost

Week of: July 14, 2019
Scripture: Luke 10:25-37

You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, and with all your soul, and with all your strength, and with all your mind; and your neighbor as yourself.
(Luke 10:27, NRSV)

Devotion

For worship arts leaders, there are three stages to the rhythm to our work:

  • We study scripture and discern how best to express it using resources of our art forms;
  • we teach our worship artists to employ their gifts to express that message; and
  • we set people free in the act of worship to express their love for God and neighbor.

Each stage of our work contains within it a beautiful invitation to employ our entire being – mind, heart, body – to express our love for God and neighbor.

When we can stay connected to God/Love in all our doing with our mind, heart and body, we more fully inhabit God/Love in our being – in our soul. It’s whole-making, liberating, healing and holy work.

The inherent beauty of staying connected to God/Love in each stage of our work is that over time, we become transformed. And as Father Richard Rohr says, “transformed people transform people.”

This is how worship artists make disciples.

Prayer

“God, I don’t really know what it means to love you with all my heart, soul, mind and strength, and my neighbor as myself, but I’m willing to give it a try. Amen.” *

* My prayer of dedication at age 15.  

Leigh Anne TaylorThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
President-Elect, The Fellowship
Deacon, The United Methodist Church
Lynchburg District Revitalization Coordinator
Lynchburg, VA

Photo: A dramatic portrayal of the story of Nicodemus as found in John 3:1-21 during a morning worship service at Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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A Spirit of Gentleness

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Fourth Sunday after Pentecost

Week of: July 7, 2019
Scripture: Galatians 6:(1-6), 7-16

My friends, if anyone is detected in a transgression, you who have received the Spirit should restore such a one in a spirit of gentleness.
(Galatians 6:1, NRSV)

Devotion

Paul writes these words to the church in Galatia to teach them how to live together in Christian community. The rest of the passage seems to caution against pride, being judgmental, and being driven by ego. Paul encourages humility, patience and gentleness.

I've always thought that there is no better example of Christian community than a worship arts group. Whether we come together to sing, dance, play instruments, or create art, we create Christian community each time we rehearse or offer our gifts in worship.

How we treat one another when we are together makes all the difference. Most especially, how we as leaders treat our participants when we make corrections makes all the difference. When we lead with a spirit of gentleness, we have the power to set people "free to serve the Lord with joy." When our leadership is hindered by pride, a judgmental attitude, or our own ego needs, we also have the power to harm or even destroy Christian community.

How can we learn to lead like Paul suggests?

Prayer

Gentle Spirit, live in me. By your mercy, let me live and lead in you. Let all I do and say honor and restore the beloved souls that you have entrusted me to lead. Amen.  

Leigh Anne TaylorThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
President-Elect, The Fellowship
Deacon, The United Methodist Church
Lynchburg District Revitalization Coordinator
Lynchburg, VA

Photo: Sylvia Bryant leads dancers in a workshop on “Dancing the Spirituals” during Music & Worship Arts Week 2018.(Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Plowing Straight

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Third Sunday after Pentecost

Week of: June 30, 2019
Scripture: Luke 9:51-62

Jesus said … "No one who puts a hand to the plow and looks back is fit for the kingdom of God."
(Luke 9:62, NRSV)

Devotion

The words of an African American spiritual speak to the scripture for this Sunday:

“You done lost your track; can’t plow straight and keep a-lookin’ back.
Keep your hand on the plow and hold on.”

People who tend the earth, those with large equipment in vast fields of crops or those of us who plant small gardens, will attest that planting in straight rows takes concentration and focus and attention to the task at hand. Taking our eyes or mind off our work, looking to see how our neighbor’s garden is growing, resenting those who have more help in the field, or using shortcuts in preparing the soil distracts us from our task and risks destroying the very thing we hope to accomplish. 

So it is with our ministry in the worship arts. We can and should be inspired by and learn from others in ministry, but when we “look back” at a church with better sound production equipment (and the people to run it) or a music program with more children in the choirs or a clergy colleague in a more influential pulpit, we are distracted and can lose our track. If we are looking back, we may plow right over the tender shoots growing from seeds we have planted. 

Plowing straight means paying attention to the ministry at hand, to the unique call God has given us, to the surprising opportunities in sight. So hold on, plow straight, and do not be distracted.

Prayer

O God of planting and of harvest,
you have called us to ministry in your garden.
Keep our hands on the tools of our work and our eyes on the straight track;
that we may be faithful in our labor, even as your faithfulness brings fruit in due season.
Through Christ, who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit, God forever. Amen.  

Barbara Day MillerThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Associate Dean Emerita for Worship and Music
Associate Professor Emerita in the Practice of Liturgy and Music
Candler School of Theology, Emory University
Atlanta, GA

Photo: Flowers are seen outside Lambuth Inn at Lake Junaluska during Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Thirsting

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Second Sunday after Pentecost

Week of: June 23, 2019
Scripture: Psalm 42 and 43

As a deer longs for flowing streams, so my soul longs for you, O God. My soul thirsts for God, for the living God.
(Psalm 42:1-2, NRSV)

Devotion

On any given morning we can look out the window at our house and see the resident herd of about 10 deer crossing from one side of the hill where they spend the night, to the far side of the hill and the flowing river where they spend the day. They move deliberately, calmly, a few fawns leaping, along the same path every day, a patterned behavior that keeps them alive. They move toward water instinctively, drawn by their daily thirst. As the night falls, they move up from the river and back to their sheltered place of rest.

The psalms are filled with images of life-giving water: streams of living water, still waters, trees planted near the water, deserts turned into pools of water. Conversely, there are vivid descriptions of the absence of water: a dry and weary land where there is no water, grass that withers, chaff blown in the wind. The psalmist knows we are like the deer, thirsting daily, needing God’s renewing water.

In the patterns of our busy lives — rehearsing, writing, creating, researching, caring for others — we often neglect our own need for water. We are thirsty, longing for flowing water, for spiritual refreshment. In this season, let us move deliberately, daily, to the source of life-giving water.

Prayer

Even as we thirst for you, O God, you lead us to the water of Life.
Bring us daily to this river of refreshment;
give us a drink of your renewing spirit;
that we may find ourselves energized anew for the ministry in which you lead us,
through Christ who is Living Water. Amen.  

Barbara Day MillerThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Associate Dean Emerita for Worship and Music
Associate Professor Emerita in the Practice of Liturgy and Music
Candler School of Theology, Emory University
Atlanta, GA

Photo: The Rev. Barbara Day Miller pours the baptismal waters during a worship service at Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Wonder

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Trinity Sunday / First Sunday after Pentecost

Week of: June 16, 2019
Scripture: Psalm 8

O LORD, our Sovereign, how majestic is your name in all the earth! … When I look at your heavens, the work of your fingers, the moon and the stars that you have established; what are human beings that you are mindful of them, mortals that you care for them? Yet you have made them a little lower than God and crowned them with glory and honor.
(Psalm 8:1a, 3-5, NRSV)

Devotion

A church in my community has a yearly “Week of Wonder” as part of its children’s ministry. It’s a week of creative exploration, arts, story and song, a time of amazing discovery, and celebration of the creation. Psalm 8 is a daily call to wonder; it’s an invitation to spread our arms wide and embrace all that God has created.

As you are planning worship this summer, organizing “weeks of wonder”, writing sermons and prayers, allow time to set those tasks aside and look up and out at the world. Take a walk in the woods. Watch the sun set over the ocean. See the sun rise across the prairie. Sit outside in the evening and listen to the owls. Spend time with children who will point you to the wonder of the smallest insect, the most interesting turtle. Feel the rhythm of your own amazing breath.

Intentional moments of meditation outdoors can give us a deep sense of comfort and gratitude, remembering God’s care for us and the earth. We can also gain a sense of perspective and space, knowing that our work as worship artists is caught up in the creative work of God, who has crowned us, gifted us, and called us.

Prayer

O God of Creation,
how great is your name in all the earth!
The work of your hands is new every morning.
Recreate in us a sense of wonder,
that we might sing of your glory all our days;
through Christ and in the Holy Spirit, now and always. Amen.  

Barbara Day MillerThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Associate Dean Emerita for Worship and Music
Associate Professor Emerita in the Practice of Liturgy and Music
Candler School of Theology, Emory University
Atlanta, GA

Photo: Lake Junaluska is seen during Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. MWAW 2019, “Spirit of Wonder,” begins on June 23. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Multiple Languages

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Day of Pentecost

Week of: June 9, 2019
Scripture: Acts 2:1-21

(The disciples) were filled with the Holy Spirit and began to speak in other languages, as the Spirit gave them ability. … And at this sound the crowd gathered and was bewildered, because each one heard them speaking in the native language of each. ... (They said), "How is it that we hear, each of us, in our own native language? ... In our own languages, we hear them speaking about God's deeds of power."
(Acts 2:4, 6, 8, 11b, NRSV)

Devotion

The reading from Acts 2 is the familiar story of Pentecost, the experience of God’s Word reaching mind and heart in the places of deep understanding.

Translating and communicating the Good News into multiple languages is the holy work of worship artists. Through our liturgical leadership, we facilitate the hearing of the Word across differences of age, situation, culture, and life circumstance. Using languages — color and texture, sound and silence, movement and stillness, word and music — we bring multiple expressions of the biblical text to the gathered assembly who speak a variety of languages, both literal and metaphoric.

Our congregations have members whose heart language is aural — who long to hear God’s message of love in music and to respond in songs of praise and hymns of the spirit. There are those who hear most deeply through tactile or kinesthetic experience, moving to the table or the font, dancing, kneeling, touching. There are others who receive and respond to the Word through visual telling in banners, stained glass windows, or the architecture of the space itself. All these people long to hear and understand in their own language.

We are gifted with the languages of worship, the artistic tools of ministry. As we plan and lead, may we use the full range of liturgical expression to tell the Good News.

Prayer

O God, through the Spirit you spoke the first Word,
and the whole order came into being;
speak again through the arts we bring to worship,
that all might know and tell of your powerful and loving deeds,
in the name of Jesus, Word made flesh. Amen.  

Barbara Day MillerThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Associate Dean Emerita for Worship and Music
Associate Professor Emerita in the Practice of Liturgy and Music
Candler School of Theology, Emory University
Atlanta, GA

Photo: Members of the dance ensemble assist in the recession of the worship elements during closing worship at Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Completely One

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Seventh Sunday of Easter

Week of: June 2, 2019
Scripture: John 17:20-26

The glory that you have given me I have given them, so that they may be one, as we are one, I in them and you in me, that they may be completely one, so that the world may know that you have sent me and have loved them even as you have loved me.
(John 17:22-23, NRSV)

Devotion

The associate minister at our church, responsible for the needs of those who come seeking assistance, is the living embodiment of this text from Sunday’s Gospel lesson. In dealing with each situation, this servant of the Lord treats every individual with enormous dignity and grace and becomes the living word in Spirit and Truth. This servant of the Lord literally shares the glory given by God and becomes one with those he serves, making them one with God through the Spirit and in love.

The lesson for me as a worship artist is to treat those with whom I work and serve with the same dignity and grace: “I in them and you in me, that they may be completely one.” 

It is our shared hope that those we reach through our many worship arts – choir, brass ensemble, handbells, liturgical dance, youth and children’s music, steel drums – will know that we are sent by God and have shared God’s love through our many and varied gifts.

The hymn “Many Gifts, One Spirit” (UMH 114) by Al Carmines speaks to this in a beautiful way.

Prayer

God of one, God of all,
God of change, God of glory,
God of colors, God of signs ...
Fill us each with the overflowing Love of Christ,
and give us the courage and grace to share that love
with everyone we encounter along the way.
Thank you for your presence in our lives and in our world.
Use us to bring about your kingdom on this earth. Amen.  

Peter InfangerThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Director of Music Ministries
First United Methodist Church
Starkville, MS

Photo: The Intermediate II Handbell Choir rings during a Thursday afternoon concert at Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Love and Peace

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Sixth Sunday of Easter

Week of: May 26, 2019
Scripture: John 14:23-29

But the Advocate, the Holy Spirit, whom the Father will send in my name, will teach you everything, and remind you of all I have said to you.
(John 14:26, NRSV)

Devotion

Fred Pratt Green’s wonderful hymn text, “Of All the Spirit’s Gifts to Me” (UMH 336) brought to mind Christopher Smart’s poem, “Jubilate Agno” set to music by Benjamin Britten under the title, “Rejoice in the Lamb.” Smart was a troubled person but seemed to be very much in tune with Jesus’ comforting words: “Peace I leave with you; my peace I give to you … Do not let your hearts be troubled, and do not let them be afraid.”

Smart finds the Spirit in many places and in times both ancient and modern: 

   “Let Jakim bless God with the dance.” 
    The flowers are “great blessings and glorify God.” 
    The instruments – the shawm, cymbal, flute, bassoon, dulcimer, clarinet,
    trumpet and harp – put “the devils themselves at peace.” 

Fred Pratt Green’s text reminds us:

Of all the Spirit’s gifts to me, I pray that I may never cease
to take and treasure most these three: love, joy and peace.
The Spirit shows me love’s the root of every gift sent from above,
of every flower, of every fruit, that God is love.
Though what’s ahead is mystery, and life itself is ours on lease,
each day the Spirit says to me, “Go forth in peace!” *

Prayer

Spirit of the living God, fall afresh on me! Fill our arts with love and peace that we may chase away the ills of this life and find peace through all our arts. May we sing, dance, play and create, so filled with the peace of Christ that your presence in the world is evident to all. Amen.  

Peter InfangerThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Director of Music Ministries
First United Methodist Church
Starkville, MS

* © 1979 Hope Publishing Company, Carol Stream, IL 60188.  All rights reserved. Used by permission.

Photo: Dancers raise their arms at Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Christ's Love

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Fifth Sunday of Easter

Week of: May 19, 2019
Scripture: John 13:31-35

Just as I have loved you, you also should love one another. By this everyone will know that you are my disciples, if you have love for one another.
(John 13:34-35, NRSV)

Devotion

This Sunday’s Gospel lesson falls under the heading, “The New Commandment.” We find Jesus admonishing the disciples to love each other, even as they have been loved. Peter’s vision found in Acts 11 reminds us that this mutual love is for everyone.

Centuries ago, Samuel Crossman (1624-1683) penned these words: “My song is love unknown, my Savior’s love to me, Love to the loveless shown, that they might lovely be.” A 21st century paraphrase of the text is found in the anthem by Pepper Choplin, “Your Love Will Be My Song.”

Listen to the anthem and follow the score as you reflect upon the text.

“Your love will be my song, Your gracious love to me ...”

As worship artists — dancers, singers, instrumentalists, visual creators, prayer leaders, preachers — we must seek ways to allow Christ’s love to flow through our arts to touch the lives of others, to share the love that comes from Christ with all to whom our lives connect.

Prayer

Loving God, fill our lives with the love of Christ and give us the courage and strength to share your love with everyone we meet. Cause us to sing, dance, play and create, so filled with the love of Christ that your presence in our lives is evident to all. Amen.  

Peter InfangerThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Director of Music Ministries
First United Methodist Church
Starkville, MS

Photo: The young adult choir rehearses in Memorial Chapel during Music & Worship Arts Week 2017. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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God's Guidance

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Fourth Sunday of Easter

Week of: May 12, 2019
Scripture: Psalm 23

He leads me in right paths for his name's sake.
(Psalm 23:3, NRSV)

Devotion

A major theme in the Psalter is the path of righteousness. In fact, the Psalter opens with a comparison of the way of the wicked and the way of the righteous in Psalm 1. That theme sets the tone for the entire book of Psalms.

In the beloved Psalm 23, the path of righteousness appears again, reminding us that God is the one who leads us on such a path. When we follow this path, God leads us beside calming waters, walks with us through dark valleys, and prepares a table for us. The commitment to follow God means a lifetime of being in right relationship with God.

Marty Haugen's "Shepherd Me, O God" (TFWS 2058) is a gorgeous setting of this psalm. The poetry of the lyrics parallels the Psalm text perfectly. There is one line in the hymn that jumps out, though, as not having a direct parallel line within Psalm 23. For that reason, the end of verse two stands out: 

My spirit shall sing the music of your name.

While the Psalm refers to being on the path for God's name's sake, it does not use imagery of our spirits singing praise as the hymn text does. It is this lovely imagery that leads us in the direction of considering how God's guidance in our life causes us to sing songs of praise. How do our spirits sing the music of God's name? Do we keep that song to ourselves or do we share it with others?  How do we lead others to share the song through our varied arts?

Prayer

Shepherd me, O God, beyond my wants, beyond my fears, from death into life. Gently you raise me and heal my weary soul. You lead me by pathways of righteousness and truth. My spirit shall sing the music of your name! Amen.  

Rev. Taylor Driskill PaffordThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Deacon in Full Connection
Associate Minister, Children, Youth and Families
Washington Street United Methodist Church
Columbia, SC

Photo: Memorial Chapel is seen on a sunny day during Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Follow

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Third Sunday of Easter

Week of: May 5, 2019
Scripture: John 21:1-19

After this, he said to him, "Follow me."
(John 21:19, NRSV)

Devotion

The beautiful hymn tune and text by Cesareo Gabarain, "Lord, You Have Come to the Lakeshore" (UMH 344), is often paired with the stories of Jesus calling his disciples by the Sea of Galilee.

Lord, you have come to the lakeshore,
Looking neither for wealthy nor wise ones;
You only asked me to follow humbly … *

We do not find this sung story of the calling of the first disciples in John's Gospel. Yet, a similar scene appears at the end of John's Gospel after Jesus' resurrection. In John 21, the disciples are fishing on the Sea of Tiberias when the resurrected Jesus appears to them for the third time. When Jesus calls them to cast their nets to the other side, Simon Peter recognizes the risen Christ. Jesus and Simon Peter have a conversation in which Jesus asks Simon Peter to care for his flock in his physical absence. His last command and call to Simon Peter is: "follow me." 

This story reminds us that our task as worship artists and disciples of Jesus Christ does not change after the resurrection. We are continually called to follow; yet we are also charged with caring for the people of God in the same way that Jesus cared for them in his life. As we lead worship through our varied arts, may we follow him and feed his sheep. 

Prayer

O Risen Christ, help us to follow you with uninhibited spirit. Grant that we might tend your sheep and feed your lambs as you, our Good Shepherd, did in your life. May we be your hands and feet in this time and place. Amen.  

Rev. Taylor Driskill PaffordThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Deacon in Full Connection
Associate Minister, Children, Youth and Families
Washington Street United Methodist Church
Columbia, SC

* English translation: © 1989 The United Methodist Publishing House

Photo: Lake Junaluska is seen during Music & Worship Arts Week 2018. (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Thomas

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Second Sunday of Easter

Week of: April 28, 2019
Scripture: John 20:19-31

Unless I see the mark of the nails in his hands and put my finger in the mark of the nails and my hand in his side, I will not believe.
(John 20:25, NRSV)

Devotion

One of the most famous depictions of “Doubting Thomas” in art is Caravaggio's The Incredulity of Saint Thomas. Looking at this artwork, I encourage you to reflect on Caravaggio's interpretation of this story. Notice Thomas' hands in Jesus' side. Look at who is guiding his hand into the wound. Observe the onlookers' faces.

Thomas gets a bad rap in some ways. Thomas was not there at Jesus' first appearance. He hears the story secondhand and perhaps thought the disciples were tricking him. Despite Thomas' doubting, Jesus comes to remove Thomas' doubt and to reassure him that the resurrection was real.

In scripture, Jesus tells Thomas to touch his wounds; yet, in Caravaggio's depiction, Jesus places Thomas' hand in his side. I imagine that Jesus' grasp alone would cause Thomas to no longer doubt; even so, Jesus affirms that he heard Thomas' doubts and allows him to touch his wounds.

The disciples' reaction to this moment between Thomas and Jesus is not in scripture. Yet, in Caravaggio's painting, we see two disciples looking on as if, perhaps, they also doubted. We can suppose that they were glad Thomas asked the question that begged an answer. Perhaps we can put ourselves in their shoes.

We were not among the disciples when Jesus appeared the first or second times. But Jesus offers us a blessing by saying, "Blessed are those who have not seen and yet have come to believe." May we overcome our doubts and faithfully believe in the resurrected Christ as we empower God's people to lead worship through the arts.

Prayer

Living God, at times we are like Thomas, doubting your ability to perform miracles. In those times, give us Jesus, that we might be touched by his grace and love. Help us to believe without seeing, that our faith may be blessed by your Holy Spirit. Amen. 

Rev. Taylor Driskill PaffordThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Deacon in Full Connection
Associate Minister, Children, Youth and Families
Washington Street United Methodist Church
Columbia, SC

Photo: Caravaggio, Michelangelo Merisi da, 1573-1610. The Incredulity of Saint Thomas, from Art in the Christian Tradition, a project of the Vanderbilt Divinity Library, Nashville, TN. http://diglib.library.vanderbilt.edu/act-imagelink.pl?RC=54170. Original source: http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:The_Incredulity_of_Saint_Thomas_by_Caravaggio.jpg.

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The Green Blade

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Resurrection of the Lord

Week of: April 21, 2019
Scripture: John 20:1-18

Supposing him to be the gardener, she said to him, "Sir, if you have carried him away, tell me where you have laid him …"
(John 20:15, NRSV)

Devotion

One of my favorite Easter hymns, which perhaps is slightly obscure and certainly underused, is "Now the Green Blade Riseth" (UMH 311). The poetic metaphor of Jesus' resurrection as a green blade rising from dead grain seems challenging, but a closer look draws us deeper into the larger biblical narrative.

Now the green blade riseth from the buried grain,
Wheat that in dark earth many days has lain;
Love lives again, that with the dead has been: 
Love is come again like wheat that springeth green.
(Hymnary.org)

In the Gospel text for Resurrection Sunday, Mary Magdalene mistakes the unknown man near the tomb for the gardener. Jesus appearing in a garden reminds us of the Garden of Eden, helping us to imagine the resurrection as a return to the goodness found in God's creation before humankind disrupts that goodness. The hymn text supports this imagery by comparing Jesus to a green blade of hope rising from the dead.

In this Easter season, may we see Jesus as that green blade, giving us hope in God's miraculous ability to make all things new. Poetry, song, dance, and visual imagery provide the gathered body the "instruments" to celebrate that Love lives again, not only in creation, but in each and every one of us. It is through the variety of arts in liturgy that worshippers are inspired to live in the love of Christ Jesus, that the whole of creation might be resurrected in goodness and in glory. 

Prayer

O Risen Christ, in your resurrection, may we see hope in newness. As you live again, help us to love again. Cause your love to grow in us so that others might come to know you and, in turn, live their lives in love and peace. Amen. 

Rev. Taylor Driskill PaffordThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
Deacon in Full Connection
Associate Minister, Children, Youth and Families
Washington Street United Methodist Church
Columbia, SC

Photo: The flowers outside Lambuth Inn at Lake Junaluska shimmer from the morning dew during Music & Worship Arts Week 2018.​     (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Weary

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Palm / Passion Sunday

Week of: April 14, 2019
Scripture: Isaiah 50:4-9a

The Lord GOD has given me the tongue of a teacher, that I may know how to sustain the weary with a word.
(Isaiah 50:4a, NRSV)

Devotion

We understand what it is like to be weary. After all, many of us will be leading worship in multiple services this week. We will move from waving branches to washing feet, from a communal meal to betrayal, from mockery to denial, from death to resurrection. Regardless of the many hours we will invest in leading worship, rehearsals, and preparation of worship space, we are not alone — God helps us. When nerves are short and tempers flare, God sustains us.

Here, in these moments, God may very well use the lives of worship artists to teach others who are weary. When a volunteer makes a biting comment about the paraments or the way a banner is hung, we can embrace their weariness. When a musician becomes snarky because they are singing or playing at their fourth worship service of the week, we can offer thanks for their willingness to serve. When our supervisor requests one more thing of us in the midst of an already busy week, we can empathize with their own stress level.

God will sustain us through the highs and lows of this week. God will not leave us or forsake us. Rather, God will guide us to model grace and mercy to our congregation. God will be with us, sustaining us as we sustain others. Thanks be to God for this promise and gift!

Prayer

God, send your Spirit to us this week. May it sustain and strengthen us, so that we might teach others, by our example, how to move from their own weariness to joy. Amen.  

Rev. Jay RegennitterThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
First United Methodist Church
Robinson, IL
Development Coordinator, The Fellowship

Photo: Members of the dance ensemble perform to "Behold the Wood of the Cross" at Music & Worship Arts Week 2018.     (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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Praise

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Fifth Sunday in Lent

Week of: April 7, 2019
Scripture: Isaiah 43:16-21

The wild animals will honor me, the jackals and the ostriches; for I give water in the wilderness, rivers in the desert, to give drink to my chosen people, the people whom I formed for myself so that they might declare my praise.
(Isaiah 43:20-21, NRSV)

Devotion

The Old Testament readings for the Revised Common Lectionary, Year C, offer up a familiar theme. Isaiah 43 follows this theme — God journeys with us. Isaiah reminds us that God has journeyed with Israel through the sea, the wilderness, and the desert. 

God has been with Israel, but God also will do a new thing. Isaiah's warning about not remembering the former things may be helpful, because Israel, when venturing into the unknown, often looked backward and longed for the past — even when the past was unhealthy. God reminds both them and us that God will be with us in the new thing that is being done. God will guide us through the wilderness and provide us with water when we need it.

The proper response to God's presence in our lives is praise. How do we teach people to praise through the arts, far beyond cursory praise? Isaiah reminds us that we were created to praise God (as does the Westminster Catechism). Can we ring with joyful hearts? Can our voices swell with thanksgiving? Can we dance with purpose and passion? To do so praises God with our lips and our lives and can inspire those in our congregations to do the same, celebrating God's presence and activity in the world.

Prayer

God, just as your creative Spirit hovered over the waters, may it move among us. May it cause us to express our thanks and praise to you, because you continue to remain faithful to us. Thanks be to you! Amen! 

Rev. Jay RegennitterThis email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.
First United Methodist Church
Robinson, IL
Development Coordinator, The Fellowship

Photo:The choir sings Richard Smallwood's "Total Praise" during worship at Music & Worship Arts Week 2018.    (Fellowship photo by Daniel Craig.)

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